Monday, October 24, 2016

Class Schedule WIN QTR 17

Click on each class title to view course description, start date, etc.

On-Campus Cluster:
Flash Fiction Cluster--Tuesdays in LUCC Conference Room

Online Classes:
Fundamentals/Teacher Prep:
FULL--IMF51400 Fundamentals of Writing for the MFA--Beth Mead

Fiction:
FULL--IMF58100 Contemporary Foundational Literature--Chris Candice
IMF53706 Revisionist Fictions: Works Inspired by Earlier Literature--J. Ted Morrissey
IMF55600 The Prose Collection: Alice Munro--Mary Anderson
IMF53703 Literature of War & Apocalypse--Scott Berzon
FULL--IMF53704 Modern Myths & Tricksters in Short Fiction--Kelli Allen 
IMF53200 Adv Focused Fiction Workshop--Tony D'Souza
IMF53900 Adv Studies in Contemporary Fiction--Wm Anthony Connolly
IMF51602 Fiction Craft & Workshop--David Hollingsworth
IMF54303 Focused Young Adult Literature--Nicole McInnes
IMF52200 Focused Fiction Workshop--Kali VanBaale

Poetry:
IMF58300 Contemporary Foundational Literature: Poetry--Ryan Smith
IMF54100 Spec Topics Workshop: Poetry Writing--Eve Jones
IMF52902 Adv St Craft of Poetry: Writing the Love Poem: A Themed Formal Verse Workshop--Anothai Kaewkaen
IMF52704 Sylvia Plath & the Tarot, Part 1--Julia Gordon-Bramer

Creative Nonfiction:
FULL--IMF55200 Creative Nonfiction Craft Foundations--Lisa Haag
IMF54600 The Personal Essay--Andrew Pryor

Scriptwriting:
IMF52400 Focused Scriptwriting Workshop--Zachary Vickers

THESIS:
IMF58999 Graduate Thesis--Beth Mead (in MFA Students group in Canvas, post faculty preference for midterm reader in the Thesis Registration thread)

First Assignment for Online Classes

Textbook Info

Faculty Bios

NOTE: At least 6 credit hours must be taken to be eligible for financial aid.

Pre-Registration Process WIN QTR 17

The Pre-Registration Process will take place in Canvas beginning on November 7 at 7am CST. You will no longer reply by email regarding your initial registration preferences.

Steps to take BEFORE November 7:
-Log into Canvas
-If you see an invitation to join the MFA Students group, click that link to enter the group.
-If you do not see an invitation, click on Courses, then on All Courses, and scroll through your class list to find MFA Students.
-Add MFA Students to your Dashboard (click on All Courses, then click the star to the left of MFA Students). Then click on MFA Students to enter the group.
-Click on Modules to view Announcements and MFA information. Feel free to take part in any discussions.
NOTE: The Winter class schedule and registration info will be viewable in Canvas by November 7. The Winter Registration Info email will be sent via Lionmail on November 7.

Steps to take ON or after November 7 at 7am CST:
-After receiving the Winter Registration info email via Lionmail, log into Canvas and click on the MFA Students group.
-Click on Modules to view the Registration module.
-Post in one of the two threads below, depending on whether you want to self-register or not:
-Click on the Self-Registration/Enable Portal discussion thread in the Registration module if you want to register yourself for winter classes when registration opens. Type your name in this thread, and then Beth will enable your portal for self-registration on Monday, November 14, at 7am CST, so that you can register yourself beginning that day and time.
-Click on the Request Beth to Register/Class Choices & Back-Ups discussion thread in the Registration module if you want Beth to register you for winter classes when registration opens. Beth will then register students in the order of posts in this thread starting at 7am CST on Monday, November 14.
-All students will be able to make any schedule changes (drop/add classes) from November 14 through December 4. MFA open enrollment will end on Monday, December 5, so all schedule changes on or after December 5 must be made by emailing Beth.
-Note: Do NOT send registration preferences by email before December 5. Canvas must be used during open enrollment through December 4. Only changes requested after open enrollment (December 5 and later) may be made via email.
-WAIT LISTS: If you hope to take a class that you think may fill quickly, you can post your name in the Wait List thread for that class beginning at 7am CST on Monday, November 14. After MFA open enrollment ends, any drops must be requested via email, so Beth will contact the first person on the Wait List for the open spot. After 24 hours, if the first person has not responded to the email, Beth will offer the spot to the second person on the Wait List for that class.
-Post any questions about the new pre-registration process and Wait List process in the Questions for Beth thread in the MFA Students group in Canvas.

WIN QTR 17 Registration begins Monday, November 14, at 7am CST. Students who have posted in the Self-Registration/Enable Portal thread will be able to enroll themselves in the portal following the registration instructions beginning that day and time. Students who have posted in the Request Beth to Register/Class Choices & Back-Ups thread will be registered beginning that day and time in the order of posts in that thread. Be sure to include back-up choices in case classes are full by the time of your enrollment.

Tuesday, August 16, 2016

LU MFA Class Schedule Fall Quarter 2016

MFA CLASS SCHEDULE--FALL QUARTER 2016
Click on each class title to view all class info

ONLINE CLASSES
David Hollingsworth: IMF 54600 The Personal Essay
Thai Kaewkaen: IMF 51700 Poetry Genres

ON-CAMPUS CLUSTERS

On-Campus Journal Editing Cluster: Poetry
TUESDAYS in LUCC

On-Campus Advanced Scriptwriting Cluster
MONDAYS in Scheidegger

See more detailed info HERE.

Sunday, August 14, 2016

New Emphasis Option for the LU MFA in Writing Degree

Lindenwood University's MFA in Writing degree now offers an option for students to declare an emphasis in one of the following genres: fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction. Depending on your personal preferences, you may prefer to pursue the general MFA in Writing degree (with coursework in any genre allowed), or you may prefer to pursue an emphasis. An emphasis requires at least 27 credit hours in your emphasis genre, including at least one required class from the emphasis class list, and a final Thesis focused on the emphasis genre.

Students starting the MFA program in Summer 2016 or later may declare an emphasis by filling out the Major Change form and emailing it to Beth Mead, the program director.

Students who began the MFA program before Summer 2016 will need to fill out additional paperwork and will need to contact Beth as soon as possible to determine eligibility and requirements for declaring an emphasis.

On-campus students may declare an emphasis if they meet the 27 credit hours in their emphasis area, but they would also be required to take one online class from the emphasis list in the chosen genre, along with their on-campus coursework.

The emphasis information is listed below and appears in the 2016-2017 catalog

The MFA in Writing is a 48-credit-hour degree program. The Graduate Thesis, in which students produce a creative thesis of 70-100 pages in the student's genre(s) of choice, is required for the final three credit hours of the program. Students select the remainder of their coursework (nine credit clusters and/or three credit online classes) from the MFA in Writing curriculum. There are no prerequisite classes; the classes may be taken in any order and from any genre.

Students have the option to declare an Emphasis in one of three areas: Fiction, Poetry, or Creative Nonfiction. An Emphasis requires a minimum of 27 credit hours of coursework in the emphasis area, including at least one class from the list below for the chosen genre. Students work with an advisor to ensure proper emphasis coursework is completed.

Students pursuing an emphasis must select at least one class from the list below for the chosen emphasis genre:

Fiction Emphasis
IMF 55100       Fiction Craft Foundations      
IMF 56100       Classic Foundational Literature: Fiction
IMF 58100       Contemporary Foundational Literature: Fiction

Poetry Emphasis
IMF 55300       Poetry Craft Foundations      
IMF 56300       Classic Foundational Literature: Poetry
IMF 58300       Contemporary Foundational Literature: Poetry

Creative Nonfiction Emphasis
IMF 55200       Creative Nonfiction Craft Foundations
IMF 56200       Classic Foundational Literature: Creative Nonfiction    
IMF 58200       Contemporary Foundational Literature: Creative Nonfiction

Important Dates 16-17

IMPORTANT UPCOMING DATES for LU MFA students:

MON 11/7: Winter Registration info email sent to MFA students; post in MFA Students group in Canvas

MON 11/14: Winter Registration Portal opens for self-registration at 7am CST

FRI 11/18: Last day to drop Fall classes (email Beth to drop)

SUN 12/4: Open enrollment ends for MFA students (any winter schedule changes after this date must be made by emailing Beth)

FRI 12/9: No event--please note that the Roundtable Reading will be held at a later date TBA in 2017.  

SAT 12/10: Commencement Ceremony 10am (available for students who will complete their degrees in September or December 2016)

Week of 12/26: University is closed; Winter Online classes may be previewed in Canvas; do not post until 1/9

FRI 12/30: Degree Application forms due in student portal for students who will complete their degrees in March 2017 or June 2017

TUE 1/3/17: On-Campus FF cluster begins for WIN QTR 17

MON 1/9: Online classes begin for WIN QTR 17

View the full 2016-2017 MFA Academic Calendar HERE

Thursday, June 30, 2016

New Submission Guidelines for The Lindenwood Review

Please note: Our updated guidelines are also posted on the TLR website HERE.


The Lindenwood Review accepts submissions of original, previously unpublished work from July 1 through November 1 via Submittable (no fee). Submissions of fiction, poetry, and personal essays are accepted each year, and a free contest in a specific genre is offered each year. For issue 7, we are offering a Lyric Essay Contest.

Submissions are welcome from both new and established writers. We look for fiction with believable characters and a vivid story; poetry with original, interesting use of language; well-crafted, honest essays; and mostly, work that moves us as readers and inspires us as writers.

Restrictions:

-Current students and faculty of Lindenwood University are not eligible to submit their work. (Alumni may submit.)

-The Board of Lindenwood University restricts some language and explicit content from university publications. When necessary, the editor will work with contributors on minor revisions to meet university requirements.

-Do not submit work that has been previously published elsewhere, whether online or in print. 

-Submissions will not be considered for publication if they are sent via email or mail, if they are received before or after the submission period, or if they do not follow the posted guidelines.

Guidelines for Fiction, Poetry, and Personal Essays: 

-Work may be submitted via Submittable from July 1 through November 1 (no fee). 

-Writers may submit in multiple genres. 

-A maximum of one short story, one personal essay, and five poems may be submitted each year.

-Maximum submission length for each genre is 20 pages. 

-Simultaneous submissions are allowed, but we ask to be notified immediately via Submittable if a piece is accepted elsewhere.

-Double-space fiction and essay; single-space poetry. Use a standard font size and style.

-Include your name and email address at the top of each submission document. List your name exactly as you would like it to appear in the book if accepted for publication.

-Include a brief third-person bio with each submission. List your name exactly as you would like it to appear in the book if accepted for publication.

-Work that is not accepted for publication will be noted as Declined on Submittable. No rejection emails will be sent, so please check Submittable for submission status. Acceptance notifications will be sent via email. All decisions will be made by February 1.

-Writers accepted for publication receive two contributor copies of The Lindenwood Review.

Guidelines & Descriptions/Examples for the Issue 7 Lyric Essay Contest

submit

Saturday, June 18, 2016

TLR7 Lyric Essay Contest -- No Entry Fee

NOTE: Descriptions and examples of lyric essays appear at the end of this post.

The Lindenwood Review is happy to offer a Lyric Essay Contest with no entry fee for issue 7. Submissions open July 1, 2016, and close November 1, 2016.

Guidelines for the Lyric Essay Contest:
  • No entry fee.
  • Winner receives $50, publication in issue 7 of The Lindenwood Review, and three contributor copies.
  • Honorable mentions receive publication in issue 7 of The Lindenwood Review and three contributor copies.
  • Lyric essays may be submitted via Submittable from July 1 through November 1. 
  • No more than three lyric essays may be submitted per writer. Create a separate submission for each essay.
  • Lyric essay submissions may include fragmented essays, braided essays, essays with poetic language usage, and other creative structures and styles for nonfiction work. See the end of this post for descriptions and examples of the lyric essay.
  • Simultaneous submissions are allowed, but we ask to be notified immediately via Submittable if a piece is accepted elsewhere.
  • Double-space and use a standard font size and style.
  • Maximum submission length for each essay is 20 pages.
  • Include your name and email address at the top of each submission document. List your name exactly as you would like it to appear in the book if accepted for publication.
  • Include a brief third-person bio with your submission. List your name exactly as you would like it to appear in the book if accepted for publication.
  • Work that is not accepted for publication will be noted as Declined on Submittable. No rejection emails will be sent, so please check Submittable for submission status. Acceptance notifications will be sent via email. All decisions will be made by February 1.
  • Writers who submit work to the contest may also submit additional work for TLR issue 7 consideration (fiction, poetry, or personal essay). See submission guidelines HERE
Restrictions:
  • Current students and faculty of Lindenwood University are not eligible to submit their work. (Alumni may submit.)
  • The Board of Lindenwood University restricts some language and explicit content in university publications. When necessary, the editor will work with contributors on minor revisions to meet university requirements. 
  • Do not submit work that has been previously published elsewhere, whether online or in print.
  • Submissions will not be considered for publication if they are sent via email or mail, if they are received before or after the submission period, or if they do not follow the posted guidelines. 
Contact us with any questions at TheLindenwoodReview@lindenwood.edu.

Lyric Essay Descriptions and Examples
Lyric essay submissions may include fragmented essays, braided essays, essays with poetic language usage, and other creative structures and styles for nonfiction work.

Eve Jones on the Lyric Essay:
Just when you think that you, reader or writer, have a handle on what the lyric essay is, it slips away and turns into something else. Meet it for coffee when it's prose, but understand it's also having a drink with someone else across the street as poetry. Here is what you know for sure: it's honest, it's true, it's surprising, its hair is a little messy, it is at once lyrically gorgeous and precisely organized, and it prefers the scenic route through the body, the past, the self, the external world. Examples of challenging & excellent contemporary lyric essayists include Anne Carson, Michael Ondaatje, Sarah Manguso, and John D'Agata.

Here's Anne Carson: “I used to think when I was younger and writing that each idea had a certain shape and when I started to study Greek and I found the word morphe it was for me just the right word for that, unlike the word shape in English which falls a bit short morphe in Greek means the sort of plastic contours that an idea has inside your all your senses when you grasp it the first moment and it always seemed to me that a work should play out that same contour in its form. So I can’t start writing something down til I get a sense of that, that morphe. And then it unfolds, I wouldn’t say naturally, but it unfolds gropingly by keeping only to the contours of that form whatever it is.”

Wm Anthony Connolly on the Lyric Essay:
The lyric essay is at the forefront of innovative writing melding the best of poetry with the best of essay composition. If a stand alone essay is said to be the autobiography of a thought and poetry the sound of experience then a lyric essay is a symphony of your brain. It looks like prose, but reads like music; it's composed like painting, but dries much quicker and you don't have to wear a smock. A lyric essay is connotative rather than denotative; it raises more questions than it answers; it's associative rather definitive; and it's beautifully fragmentary. It free-falls with juxtaposition and folly. A close cousin to the prose poem, the lyric essay is a short work of prose designed to illustrate not only what the writer is thinking, but perhaps more importantly how the writer thought what they were thinking. A lyric essay reveals how you view the world.

Examples of The Lyric Essay:
submit


On-Campus or Fully Online/No Residency Requirement